Pupil Premium Review July 2016

Pupil premium funding was introduced in 2011 to raise achievement among disadvanataged children. It is allocated to children from low-income families who are eligible for free school meals (FSM) and children who have been looked after continuously for more than six months. At present PPF is extended to those who have been eligible at any point in the previous 6 years.

Amount of Money Spent 2015 to 2016 – Allocations

Number of pupils on role 406
Total number eligible for pupil premium grant 22
Amount of PPG received per pupil £1320 x 16£1900 x 3£300 x 3
Total received Total of £27400 ( adjusted to £26120)

 2016 to 2017 – Allocations

Number of pupils on role 419
Total number eligible for pupil premium grant 17
Amount of PPG received per pupil
Total received £28028

 Provisions for the spending of Pupil Premium Funding
In St Edmund Campion School there are a range of foci on which the pupil premium allocation is spent;
Target setting gives an opportunity for teachers to discuss 1:1 with each pupil their learning journey at the beginning of the year. It is an informal discussion and can sometimes provide key information that will help the child’s future.
Parent and Pupil Support Practitioner (PPSP) offers out of class pastoral as well as behavioural support and leaves the teachers to continue teaching the rest of the class.  She is an invaluable link trusted by the children, not seen as a teacher, but also welcomed by the majority of parents.  Feedback from meetings ensures the teacher is fully versed with any issues at school and at home and can be aware of these with any classroom decisions whether behavioural or pastoral.
Maths Support provides an extra TA in some classes where PP may be either behind or in need of boosting to make greater progress. This also benefits other children within the class who also may require support.
The PP funding also helps to pay for school trips including the Y5 PGL and the Year 6 Wales residential trip. Extra support from the Spoore, Merry and Rixman Trust is also sought when necessary. There are a range of discrete opportunities given to children with specific needs on a case by case basis including art therapy. Incidental uniform, stationery and more personal items are also considered according to need.

Year 6 PP Children-Attainment in KS2 SATs tests. (Required 100+ to maximum of 120)

Year 6

Maths

Reading

GPS

Writing (teacher assessed)

Science

(teacher assessed)

1

101

98

108

EXS

EXS

2

109

105

108

EXS

EXS

3

117

114

113

EXS

EXS

The pupil premium children achieved an average scaled score of 107.3 for reading and maths compared with 107.6 for the rest of the cohort. In progress terms this gives a score of +2.3 compared with +2.9 for the rest of the cohort. With reading and maths this means a score of +1% with +8% for the rest of the cohort

EXS = code for expected standard in 2016. Greater depth assessment only available in writing.
Key:     E – Expected within stage
T- Towards expected stage
P –pre stage expectations
G – Greater depth (not in Year 2 & 6 due to particular prescriptive requirements)

Summary for year 6 – All children achieved over the 100 scaled score except for one who missed the reading by 2 marks. This child received 1:1 reading every day when she was present in school. Lack of parental involvement in homework was also key.

Maths

KS1

pupils

Average attainment

Progress through year

At or above expectation

All pupils

122

E

-

82%

Pupil premium

1

-

100% 

KS2

Y 3-5

pupils

Average attainment

Progress through year

At or above expectation

All pupils

180

E

+1.7

82%

Pupil premium

11

E

+1.5

100% 

Reading

KS1

pupils

Average attainment

Progress through year

At or above expectation

All pupils

122

E

(EY)

84%

Pupil premium

1

E

+2.0

100%

KS2 y3-5

Pupils

Average attainment

Progress through year

At or above expectation

All pupils

180

E

+1.9

88%

Pupil premium

21

E

+1.5

60% 

Writing

KS1

pupils

Average attainment

Progress through year

At or above expectation

All pupils

121

E

+1.2

75%

Pupil premium

21

E

+1.0

100%

KS2 y3-5

pupils

Average attainment

Progress through year

At or above expectation

All pupils

60

E

+1.6

70%

Pupil premium

4

E

+1.2

43

 

1.   What are the barriers to learning, desired outcomes and success criteria?

The barriers to learning are many and varied across the PP children within the school and, as such, addressed in a personalised way.

The desired outcome is that every child makes progress across each stage and achieves to the best of their ability.

The success criterion depends upon the year group. In year 2 a Teacher Assessment judgement is made according to a secure fit of most aspects of the KS1 curriculum.  In Year 6 the children are tested by the use of external tests (SATS) which have very prescriptive descriptors in order to gauge success. In these years the children’s success is allied to these descriptors which are published by the government. The school recognises that children learn and mature in different ways and may not make the same amount of progress each year but looks to ensure that progress is made at the Key stage end of year 2 and year 6.

In Year 1 the school has regard to the EYFS profile in in assessing the progress and attainment made in Year 1 and thus will have regard to the expected progress by the end of year 2. In years 3, 4 and 5 the school refers back the KS1 teacher assessment information in order to inform planning so that lessons are differentiated,  physical resources are used and staff deployed to develop each child within each stage in order to ensure that the children achieve at least expected progress from this point.

As an aspirational school, targets are often based upon the expectations of the top 5% of schools but teachers recognise that a child’s achievement does not always follow a straight line. Children work throughout the school on developing a growth mind-set and their understanding improves as they move through the school. With transition preparation for secondary school starting in year 5 and continuing in year 6 with different lesson formats and independent learning expectations, children gradually develop a maturity in their approach to their learning and the extra curricula opportunities available. This helps children to become independent, assertive and well-motivated learners, able to communicate with adults and children in a mature manner, yet not losing the delight for engagement with the learning process.

A child leaving with a growth mind-set, a positive attitude to learning and a scaled score that shows above expected progress will have achieved our success criteria.

2.   To what extent has there been a focus on specific groups of pupils e.g. high ability, service premium, adopted children?

All these groups have been represented in the school over the 2015 to 2016 academic year. The particular needs of each child are carefully considered in order to ensure that pupil premium money is used for maximum effect. As a result high ability children have had extra teaching to achieve at an even deeper level, service premium children have been given opportunities to achieve including consideration of the impact of moving between many schools, adopted children are carefully considered as to any specific needs that may have arisen as a result of their adoption.  Those children with mild behavioural issues may benefit from working with a range of adults. Teachers and TAs are constantly reflective about their approach and responses to children who experienced problems reacting to not only their peers, but adults in the teaching environment. Here the Parents and Pupil Support Practitioner/ELSA is a valuable asset.  Focus is always on individual need rather than attention to a specific group.

3.   What evaluation has there been of which current approaches are working well and whether better approaches could be used?

A case study has been produced by the class teacher for each PP child.  The successes and areas of development of different aspects have been tracked as follows;

  • Most successful – an experienced teacher who is able to work with individual children, adapt a range of resources, including materials from the respective class teachers to provide boosting and support across the curriculum.
  • Small group working with an experienced teacher. This has particular impact on the Year 2 and Year 6 groups.
  • In-class grouping with teacher with a teaching Assistant (TA ) supporting the rest of the class/ supporting another group.
  • Team Teaching with experienced TA alongside other children who require same support – largely successful.
  • In-class grouping with TA, either 1:1, or in a small group. Successful due to teacher carefully monitoring the learning of pupils in the group.
  • Regular Toe-by-Toe, daily spelling/phonics programme with a TA – works well but does depend on punctuality as this activity will tend to occur at registration in the morning.
  • Targeted subject specific interventions with a teacher or an experienced TA – this ensures the child keeps up with the rest of the class.
  • Involvement of Parent Support practitioner/ ELSA, who is able to work with children and parents according to need.
  • Behaviour support – although this needs to be supported by parental involvement. If parents do not buy in, the impact lessens.
  • Numbers Count (a maths recovery programme for Y2)– works well for most children-all make progress.
  • Children’s awareness of the availability for this extra support – ‘Why am I going out?’
  • Conscious grouping of children with those who are going to set a good example/ show positive learning behaviours – results vary depending on the awareness of the child and their maturity.

4.   What focus has there been on different approaches and how these build up to an effective coherent strategy?

The first part of the strategy must be the identification of the status/ability of the children. Without careful identification especially in respect of children who move mid-year there may be some slippage.

Teachers record/highlight these students within their mark books and will identify ways in which each particular child may be supported in order to achieve. This may include suggested groupings with whom the PP child may work. The rest of the group may not be PP but may have similar needs.

Often the needs of the children can be incorporated within the class but teachers will inform the Deputy Head (DH) and the Parent and Pupil Support Practitioner (PPSP) should any extra requirements, either academic or pastoral, be required.  The DH will then discuss the needs of the children together with the with the Teachers available for PP teaching and the class teacher who will provide specific information about the child’s needs and how progress could be achieved. Regular revisions and discussions between all parties will ensure that the children are at the heart of any decisions.

At the three Standards Governors meetings the progress of PP children is discussed anonymously with the DH as PP Leader feeding back to the Governing Body and sharing the evaluations of strategies chosen and the potential ways forward.  Before these meetings teachers produce a breakdown of the progress made by their PP children and a brief statement of the strategies adopted to date, their success and any changes they intend to make moving forward.

5.   Which approaches are not yet having the desired impact but could deliver impact if things were done differently or staff receive support to develop?

Teachers are continually reflective about their decisions with regard to all children’s learning but major decisions as to specific  interventions or actions relating to a PP child are then discussed first with Key Stage member Senior Leadership Team (SLT) and then to the DH. In this way the reasoning behind any decisions is tried and tested and opportunities for new thinking may arise. Evaluations are then feedback to the Gvering Body anonymously via the Standards Governors Committee.

The way forward;

  • Parental involvement –The majority of parents are both interested and actively involved with their child’s learning.  Workshops and parents meetings including the mandatory parents’ evenings are offered. Regular newsletters ensure that parents do not miss key dates. Ways of involving parents and encouraging them to see the teachers as partners in their child’s education is most beneficial.
  • Behaviour Management –good learning behaviour is crucial. The PPSP works at length with parents and children to improve these behaviours when necessary.
  • The school is lucky to have teaching assistants with many and varying skills. Making the most of these skills is an ongoing process and whilst the more experienced have run booster groups for some time, in the academic year 2016 to 2017 it is intended to focus particular strengths in particular lessons where they can have maximum effect. This may mean working outside their regular year group.
  • The SLT continue to research and evaluate different ways of providing support including a range of interventions. Wider CPD by all staff will help all to understand the benefits of different types of support.
  • Access to space. Pupil premium teachers require larger space to support more children.
  • Whilst placing children in groups with other children of similar need there are some children who benefit from strictly 1:1 teacher support. This is considered carefully when allocating children for support.

6.   Which approaches are unlikely to deliver impact and should be withdrawn?

Every year the approach to PP support must remain flexible and whilst different strategies are used with different children, staff must be aware of the needs of each child. Some approaches may work for some and not with others. No strategy will be disregarded if it has worked for another child but discretion is always used to ensure that money is spent appropriately and to support learning.

Sandra Barry
Deputy Head teacher and Pupil Premium Leader

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